Fixing slow-moving autosteps|Grease up the rusty links

Maybe this problem is the most common pattern. Grease up the linkage as you go, even if it’s a hassle, you may be able to keep it in good shape even if it’s over 300,000km.

Slow-moving autostep

At around 200,000 km, the autostep started to work poorly. Especially in the winter.

Simply “Is it the voltage drop? So I sprayed a moisturizer on the link and left it there. However, the symptom worsened day by day, and finally, I had to pull the link by hand to get it out properly!

So we decided to take down the autostep.

It came off more easily than I thought.

If you jack the rear differential and look at the autostep, there are two connectors at the back of the unit on the autostep, so you need to remove those connectors first.

Then remove the two 12mm bolts, one side bolt and two nuts, then you can take the unit down. But it’s pretty heavy!

Once it was on my chest, I placed it on the side of my body in a zippered position. The reason for using two nuts was to make it easier to attach them temporarily when assembling them.

I’m gonna try to move it around for now.

There are two links. Which link is worse? I don’t know so I removed the step from the unit.

It’s hard to remove it as it is, so I used a 21mm clip driver to get the step out manually.

Remove the 14mm bolt from the unit. I used the impact bolts to remove it. I had to hit it with a hammer to remove it. It seems to be very difficult to assemble this thing.

I thought to turn the 17mm bolt that fixes the oval-shaped iron plate of the linkage, but I used impact because this is also quite hard. If this bolt is turned, the link can be disassembled easily.

When I saw the contents of the linkage which appeared when I took off the oval cover, I thought that a snap ring was used and tried to take it off as hard as I could.

But actually, this is not a snap ring, and without doing anything, if you push it lightly with your finger, the contents will come out.

When I realized that fact, I was stunned.

This one came out of the core easily and was very clean inside. The groove in the middle of the tube is probably a grease reservoir? This link looks perfectly fine. Greased up and restored.

Which link is it?

There are two links. Which link is worse? I don’t know so I removed the step from the unit first.

Use a 21mm wrench to get the step out of the unit.

Remove the 14mm bolt from the unit. I used an impact wrench to remove it because it is very hard. I had to use a hammer to remove it. It seems to be very difficult to assemble this thing.

I thought to turn the 17mm bolt that fixes the oval-shaped iron plate of the linkage, but I used the impact wrench because this was also quite hard. If this bolt is turned, the link can be dismantled easily.

When I took off the oval cover, I thought that a snap ring was used for the link, but in fact, this is neither a snap ring nor a snap ring.

When I realized this fact, I was astonished.

This one came out of the core easily and was very clean inside. The groove in the middle of the tube is probably a grease reservoir? This link looks perfectly fine. Greased up and restored.

I found a link to the bad one.

Touch the other link and I’m sure of it! Unlike the link from earlier, it doesn’t work by hand at all!

He’s sticking to it beautifully! The core inside won’t come out when I try to disassemble it!

I had no choice, so I applied a bolt to it and hit it with a hammer.

At this time, I hit my thumb on the hammer. I’m pretty relaxed…

When I finally took out the core, it was half rusty. … Is it out of grease?

I papered off the rust and used used parts this time. Yes, the movement is perfect. I pulled out the core again and applied the grease to the inside and the groove.

I wanted to use silicone grease, but I used Moridevden grease.

When I took out the grease, I found white powder inside the linkage, which is probably the remains of silicone grease.

So next time when I have the opportunity to remove the linkage, I will use silicone grease.

Installing the steps

Once you’ve restored the link and made sure it works smoothly, install the steps.

Good to get the steps off, but installing them is pretty hard! I couldn’t do it without a hammer, so I wished I had a rubber hammer if possible.

If you don’t have a rubber hammer, you may want to wrap a normal hammer with Wes or something similar. If you don’t have a rubber hammer, you can wrap a normal hammer with Wes or something like that.

Anyway, the 14mm bolt that fixes the step and the stay will not go in if you don’t make fine adjustments with a hammer.

It was quite tiring.

Now it’s time to install the auto-step to the body.

When you are exhausted, we attach the Autostep to the car body.

When you assemble this heavy autostep to the car body, you put it on your stomach and move it under the car body while you are lying down^^^;

After that, tighten 3 bolts and 2 nuts to connect the 2 couplers. This is the end of the work.

When I opened the door, the steps that used to move painfully come out and retract quickly.

This moment is the only thing that helps to heal my fatigue.

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